Art

 Friend
Promovouchers UK
http://www.promovouchers.co.uk/
 Popular Gallery
 Maps
 Help development
 Art

Titian Vecelli (Pieve di Cadore, 1490 - Venice, 1576)  Salome with the Head of John the Baptist  Oil on canvas, about 1511  90 x 72 cm  Galleria Doria-Pamphili, Rome, Italy
Goback 5 / 11 Forward

Title: Salome
Description:
Titian Vecelli (Pieve di Cadore, 1490 - Venice, 1576)
Salome with the Head of John the Baptist
Oil on canvas, about 1511
90 x 72 cm
Galleria Doria-Pamphili, Rome, Italy

Salome (Greek: Σαλωμη, Salōmē), the Daughter of Herodias (c AD 14 - between 62 and 71), is known from the New Testament (Mark 6:17-29 and Matt 14:3-11, where, however, her name is not given). Another source from Antiquity, Flavius Josephus' Jewish Antiquities, gives her name and some detail about her family relations.

Name in Hebrew reads שלומית (Shlomit) and is derived from Shalom שלום, meaning "peace".

Christian traditions depict her as an icon of dangerous female seductiveness, for instance depicting as erotic her dance mentioned in the New Testament (in some later transformations further iconised to the dance of the seven veils), or concentrate on her lighthearted and cold foolishness that, according to the gospels, led to John the Baptist's death. A new ramification was added by Oscar Wilde, who in his play Salome let her devolve into a necrophiliac, killed the same day as the man whose death she had requested. This last interpretation, made even more memorable by Richard Strauss's opera based on Wilde, is not consistent with Josephus' account; according to the Romanized Jewish historian, she lived long enough to marry twice and raise several children. Few literary accounts elaborate the biographical data given by Josephus.
According to Mark 6:21-29, Salome was the stepdaughter of Herod Antipas, danced before him and her mother Herodias at the occasion of his birthday, and in doing so gave her mother the opportunity to obtain the death of John the Baptist. According to Mark's gospel Herodias bore a grudge against John for stating that Herod's marriage to Herodias was unlawful; Herodias encouraged Salome to demand that John be uted.
And when a convenient day was come, that Herod on his birthday made a supper to his lords, high captains, and chief estates of Galilee; And when the daughter of the said Herodias came in, and danced, and pleased Herod and them that sat with him, the king said unto the damsel, Ask of me whatsoever thou wilt, and I will give it thee. And he sware unto her, Whatsoever thou shalt ask of me, I will give it thee, unto the half of my kingdom. And she went forth, and said unto her mother, What shall I ask? And she said, The head of John the Baptist.
And she came in straightway with haste unto the king, and asked, saying, I will that thou give me by and by in a charger the head of John the Baptist. And the king was exceeding sorry; yet for his oath's sake, and for their sakes which sat with him, he would not reject her. And immediately the king sent an utioner, and commanded his head to be brought: and he went and beheaded him in the prison, and brought his head in a charger, and gave it to the damsel: and the damsel gave it to her mother. And when his disciples heard of it, they came and took up his corpse, and laid it in a tomb. (Mark 6:21-29, KJV)

A parallel passage to Mark 6:21-29 is in the Gospel of Matthew 14:6-11:
But on Herod's birthday, the daughter of Herodias danced before them: and pleased Herod. Whereupon he promised with an oath, to give her whatsoever she would ask of him. But she being instructed before by her mother, said: Give me here in a dish the head of John the Baptist. And the king was struck sad: yet because of his oath, and for them that sat with him at table, he commanded it to be given. And he sent, and beheaded John in the prison.
And his head was brought in a dish: and it was given to the damsel, and she brought it to her mother. And his disciples came and took the body, and buried it, and came and told Jesus. (Matt 14:6-11, D-R)

Some ancient Greek versions of Mark read "Herod's daughter Herodias" (rather than "daughter of the said Herodias"). To scholars using these ancient texts, both mother and daughter had the same name. However, the Latin Vulgate Bible translates the passage as it is above, and western Church Fathers therefore tended to refer to Salome as "Herodias's daughter" or just "the girl". Nevertheless, because she is otherwise unnamed in the Bible, the idea that both mother and daughter were named Herodias gained some currency in early modern Europe.[citation needed]

This Salome is not considered to be the same person as Salome the disciple, who is a witness to the Crucifixion of Jesus in Mark 15:40.


Hits: 4305
Direct Link
HTML code
BB code
Goback 5 / 11 Forward
Titian Vecelli (Pieve di Cadore, 1490 - Venice, 1576)  Three Ages of Man  Oil on canvas, about 1509  90 x 151 cm  National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh, United KingdomTitian Vecelli (Pieve di Cadore, 1490 - Venice, 1576)  Salome with the Head of John the Baptist  Oil on canvas, about 1511  90 x 72 cm  Galleria Doria-Pamphili, Rome, ItalyTitian Vecelli (Pieve di Cadore, 1490 - Venice, 1576)  Entombment of Christ  Oil on canvas, about 1516  148 x 215 cm  Musee du Louvre, Paris, France
 Welcome in Gallery

We are proud to say we are one of the largest and most comprehensive online collections. On our pages you will find over 10,000 works of art. We are dedicated to bringing you quality information about artists and their artwork all around the world.

 Best gallery
2018 All right reserved Web Gallery