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John William Waterhouse (6 April 1849  10 February 1917)  Nymphs finding the Head of Orpheus  Oil on canvas, 1900  149 x 99 cm  Private collection
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Title: Nymphs
Description:
 
John William Waterhouse (6 April 1849 — 10 February 1917)
Nymphs finding the Head of Orpheus
Oil on canvas, 1900
149 x 99 cm
Private collection

Traditionally, Orpheus was the son of a Muse (probably Calliope, the patron of epic poetry) and Oeagrus, a king of Thrace (other versions give Apollo). According to some legends, Apollo gave Orpheus his first lyre. Orpheus' singing and playing were so beautiful that animals and even trees and rocks moved about him in dance. 

Orpheus joined the expedition of the Argonauts, saving them from the music of the Sirens by playing his own, more powerful music. On his return, he married Eurydice, who was soon killed by a snakebite. Overcome with grief, Orpheus ventured himself to the land of the dead to attempt to bring Eurydice back to life. With his singing and playing he charmed the ferryman Charon and the dog Cerberus, guardians of the River Styx. His music and grief so moved Hades, king of the underworld, that Orpheus was allowed to take Eurydice with him back to the world of life and light. Hades set one condition, however: upon leaving the land of death, both Orpheus and Eurydice were forbidden to look back. The couple climbed up toward the opening into the land of the living, and Orpheus, seeing the Sun again, turned back to share his delight with Eurydice. In that moment, she disappeared.

Orpheus himself was later killed by the women of Thrace. The motive and manner of his death vary in different accounts, but the earliest known, that of Aeschylus, says that they were Maenads urged by Dionysus to tear him to pieces in a Bacchic orgy because he preferred the worship of the rival god Apollo. His head, still singing, with his lyre, floated to Lesbos, an oracle of Orpheus was established. The head prophesied until the oracle became more famous than that of Apollo at Delphi, at which time Apollo himself bade the Orphic oracle stop. The dismembered limbs of Orpheus were gathered up and buried by the Muses. His lyre they had placed in the heavens as a constellation.

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John William Waterhouse (6 April 1849  10 February 1917)  Mrs A. P. Henderson  Oil on canvas, 1909  Private collectionJohn William Waterhouse (6 April 1849  10 February 1917)  Nymphs finding the Head of Orpheus  Oil on canvas, 1900  149 x 99 cm  Private collectionJohn William Waterhouse (6 April 1849  10 February 1917)  Nymphs finding the Head of Orpheus (Study)  Oil on canvas, circa 1900  Private collection
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