Art

 Friend
Promovouchers UK
http://www.promovouchers.co.uk/
 Popular Gallery
 Maps
 Help development
 Art

John William Waterhouse (6 April 1849  10 February 1917)  Miranda  Oil on canvas, 1875  12 x 15 in  Pivate collection
Goback 35 / 86 Forward

Title: Miranda
Description:
 
John William Waterhouse (6 April 1849 — 10 February 1917)
Miranda
Oil on canvas, 1875
12 x 15 in
Pivate collection

Miranda is a character is William Shakespeare's play The Tempest. The play was first performed around 1611.

Waterhouse painted versions of Miranda at the start and end of his career. The other versions are both dated 1916.
 
In Shakespeare's play The Tempest, Miranda is the beautiful daughter of the old Duke Prospero.

Cast away with her father since she was three years old, she has lived an extremely sheltered existence. Though she has received a well-rounded education her father, she is desperately lacking in real world experience. The fifteen year old does not choose her own husband; instead, Prospero sends Ariel, his spirit servant, to fetch Ferdinand while Miranda is asleep, and arranges things so that the two will come to love one another. Her sexual experience is limited to fighting off the lustful advances of her father's slave, Caliban, who tried to rape her. her limited knowledge of the world, she assumes that all men are good:
With those that I saw suffer: a brave vessel,
Who had no doubt some noble creature in her,
Dashed all to pieces! O, the cry did knock
Against my very heart. (I.ii.6–9)

Another aspect of her is her tendency to get emotionally attached. Even as she watches the massive storm caused by her father she becomes emotionally entwined with the fates of the mariners, Miranda is very prone to emotions:
O, I have suffered
With those that I saw suffer! (I.ii.5–6)
However, even though she is thought typically as a naïve girl, she also displays moments of great strength. For example in these lines — which many editors have transferred to Prospero — she sheds her usual passive role, scolding Caliban:
When thou didst not, savage,
Know thine own meaning, but wouldst gabble like
A thing most brutish, I endowed thy purposes
With words that made them known….who hadst dissevered more than a prison (I.ii.354–359)


Miranda also challenges her father when she begs for the life of those on the ship, telling him: "Had I been any great god of power, I would have sunk the sea within the earth, or ere the good ship so have swallowed, and the fraughting souls within her!"
 
Hits: 7738
Direct Link
HTML code
BB code
Goback 35 / 86 Forward
John William Waterhouse (6 April 1849  10 February 1917)  La Fileuse  Oil on canvas, 1874  31.7 x 25.6 cm  Pivate collectionJohn William Waterhouse (6 April 1849  10 February 1917)  Miranda  Oil on canvas, 1875  12 x 15 in  Pivate collectionJohn William Waterhouse (6 April 1849  10 February 1917)  Miranda  Oil on board, 1916  18 3/4 x 23 3/4 in  Pivate collection
 Welcome in Gallery

We are proud to say we are one of the largest and most comprehensive online collections. On our pages you will find over 10,000 works of art. We are dedicated to bringing you quality information about artists and their artwork all around the world.

2018 All right reserved Web Gallery