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Peter Paul Rubens (1577  1640)  The Landing of Marie de' Médici at Marseilles  Oil on canvas, 1623-1625  155 x 116 1/8 inches (394 x 295 cm)  Musée du Louvre, Paris, France
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Title: Marie de' Médici at Marseilles
Description:

Peter Paul Rubens (1577 1640)

The Landing of Marie de' Médici at Marseilles

Oil on canvas, 1623-1625
155 x 116 1/8 inches (394 x 295 cm)
Musée du Louvre, Paris, France



Having never been a particularly graceful event for anyone, disembarking a ship does not pose a problem for Rubens in his depiction of Marie de' Medici arriving in Marseilles after having been married to Henri IV by proxy in Florence. Rubens has again, turned something ordinary into something of unprecedented magnificence. He depicts her leaving the ship down a gangplank (she actually walked up, not down, but was illustrated this way by Rubens to create a diagonal element). She was accompanied by the Grand Duchess of Tuscany and her sister, the Duchess of Mantua, into the welcoming, allegorical open arms of France, evidenced by the golden fleur-de-lis on his cape of royal blue. Her sister and aunt flank Marie while two trumpets are blown simultaneously by an ethereal Fame. All this occurs while Neptune and his corps of Nereids rise from the sea, after having accompanied her on the long voyage to procure her safe arrival in Marseilles. It is melody and song as Rubens combines heaven and Earth, history and allegory into a symphony for the eyes of the viewer.[49] Moreover, in The Debarkation at Marseilles, Marie is welcomed to her new home by a personified France, wearing a helmet and a blue mantle with golden fleur-de-lis in the painting. Above, Fame blows two horns to announce her arrival to the people of France with her future husband. Below, Neptune, three sirens, a sea-god, and a triton help escort the future Queen to her new home. To the left, the arms of the Medici can be seen above an arched structure, a Knight of Malta stands in all of his regalia. On a side note, Avermaete discusses an interesting idea that is particularly present in this canvas.

"He [Rubens] surrounded her [Marie de' Medici] with such a wealth of appurtenances that at every moment she was very nearly pushed into the background. Consider, for example, the Disembarkation at Marseilles, everyone has eyes only for the voluptuous Naiads, to the disadvantage of the queen who is being received with open arms by France"

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Peter Paul Rubens (1577  1640)  The abduction Ganimede  (steam for the painting Peter Paul Rubens (1577  1640)  The Landing of Marie de' Médici at Marseilles  Oil on canvas, 1623-1625  155 x 116 1/8 inches (394 x 295 cm)  Musée du Louvre, Paris, FrancePeter Paul Rubens (1577-1640)  Garden of Love  Oil on canvas, c.1633  77 7/8 x 111 3/8 inches (198 x 283 cm)  Museo del Prado, Madrid
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